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Species Conservation Research Center

Seoul Zoo puts considerable effort into protecting the endangered animals and plants.

As a part of these efforts, the Seoul Zoo conducts a species conservation movement. Nature, animals, and plants are severely damaged by human activities, such as the destruction of the environment, indifference, poaching, and overhunting. Seoul Zoo offers considerable efforts to protect endangered animals and plants through species conservation studies.

Introduction and Role

Ecological Study

Seoul Zoo, designated as an institution for the preservation of endangered species as well as a role of their natural habitats, conducts research on breeding management and proliferation, and the release of endangered species into the wild. It plays the role of a ‘Noah’s Ark’ that returns endangered wild animals to the wild in the event that they become extinct in their natural wildlife habitats. It is engaged in research on wildcats, otters, spoonbills, doves, freshwater tortoise, and Korean golden frogs.

Species Conservation Study

In its role as an institution dedicated to the preservation of endangered species, Seoul Zoo carries out research for the preservation of endangered wild animals. It is currently engaged in research in various areas such as genetic resource conservation, propagation hormone utilizing feces, and infectious diseases, and is establishing a genetic resource bank for various wild species.

Animal Hospital

The animal hospital manages the health of all of the animals in the zoo, and carries out a variety of tasks including vaccination, medical examination, disease diagnosis, treatment, euthanasia, and autopsy. It also treats, rehabilitates and releases animals rescued from the wild in its capacity as a wildlife treatment institution.

Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC)

Our zoo is the first in Korea to have its animal research approved by the IACUC, as well as being the first to conduct education on the ethics of animal research. Consequently, we are playing a leading role in reinforcing the research capability of Korean zoos and improving their reputation among the international community.

[photo]A medical team treats animals
[photo]A pathology team explaining to field children
[photo]The pathology team is studying
[photo]Making wild habitat for ecological research
[photo]Ecological habitat of frog
[photo]The appearance of endangered species for breeding and restoration